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Fact#5: Vitamin E in cosmetics is to an extent a pointless ingredient.

Often we see that products which are supposed to be applied topically (not ingested) contain Vitamin E - usually added by breaking open a capsule of soft gel or powder.

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Vitamin E was said to be beneficial for one’s immune system, skin, and eyes and while that may well be the case it has recently become popular as a dietary supplement, marketed as an antioxidant (a substance that protects cells from damage) that aids in preventing everything from heart diseases to diabetes and Alzheimer's.

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We were surprised to find out that Vitamin E isn’t a single molecule, it is a common name for several molecules! According to WebMD the studies researching the effect of Vitamin E supplements on preventing or treating said diseases have been disappointing. They’ve only helped people with an actual Vitamin E deficiency which is quite rare and they’ve actually been detrimental to those who have ingested large amounts of it over a longer period of time in several different ways. Source:

http://www.webmd.com/diet/supplement-guide-vitamin-e#1

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Even if that was, in fact, the case and Vitamin E would have such omnipotent powers the topical application of it has either no benefits or it may even cause a skin irritation. According to the study found on the website of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) about the benefits of applying Vitamin E on surgical scars “the results of this study [showed] that topically applied vitamin E does not help in improving the cosmetic appearance of scars and leads to a high incidence of contact dermatitis.” Source:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10417589

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And yes this study was if there are no wounds on the skin? Does it help at all?

The thing with Vitamin E is that the dose we require daily (15mg/day for adult male and female individuals) is easily ingested through food which makes the absorption far more efficient especially because it is fat-soluble. Foods that contain Vitamin E are eggs, nuts, leafy greens, vegetable oils and fortified cereals.

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Another thing is that topical application of Vitamin E in higher doses can irritate the skin whether there are wounds on the skin or not so the quantities found in cosmetics are so insignificant that they do not harm us but they also don’t benefit us. Vitamin E is mainly added as a preservative and represents between 0.05% and 1% of all the ingredients even though it is falsely promoted for the properties it has when ingested in normal dosage through food.


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